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Tutorials & Samples

Our documents provide you with all of the valuable tips, tricks, and lessons we've learned from more than 20 years of proposal writing and business development

Our tutorials can be purchased individually or as part of a membership that saves you money while turning our site into a just-in-time online training resource.  Our documents will save you time, provide inspiration, sharpen you skills, and improve your win rate.

 


509 Questions to Answer in Your Proposal 509 Questions to Answer in Your Proposal HOT!

Get some serious inspiration for proposal authors at all levels. It's perfect for figuring out what to write, and for making sure you answer all of your customer's questions.  We provide the questions, you supply the answers. While it may not be as sexy as a template that writes the proposal for you, it's actually one of our most useful documents.  Highly recommended.

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$19.95

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Proposal Format and Samples Guide Proposal Format and Samples Guide On Sale! HOT!

The most frequent question we get asked is "what should my proposal look like?"  This is closely followed by "can I see a sample of a proposal?"  Even though we tell people that winning proposals are built from the ground up to meet the concerns of specific customers and not by following samples, people still crave them.  This package bundles includes our Proposal Format Guide, Sample Introductory Paragraphs, and Sample Proposal Layouts all for a single discounted package price.

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$49.95

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How to Write a Management Plan How to Write a Management Plan

This guide is organized like a cookbook, providing over 180 items divided into 20 topics.  It will help you answer your customer's questions regarding how the work will be done, who will do it, what resources will be required, how to mitigate the risks, and what you will do to ensure quality. It will help you proove to your customer that you can successfully manage the project and deserve to win the contract.

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How to Write an Executive Summary How to Write an Executive Summary On Sale!

Our best selling tutorial provides help for the most important part of a proposal.  The Executive Summary is critical because a lot of people will read no further. Learn how to write a fantastic Executive Summary that can persuade the reader all by itself.

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$12.95

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Business Development for Project Managers and Engineers Business Development for Project Managers and Engineers

Provides easy to follow approaches to business development for people with technical backgrounds. If you have technical managers with responsibility for growth or sales but don't have the experience or background to feel comfortable with it, the problem solving approaches in this document are just what they need.

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How to Survive Your First Business Proposal How to Survive Your First Business Proposal

Writing your first business proposal doesn't have to be intimidating. It's amazing how much stress can come from a blank sheet of paper and a deadline. Our guide tells you what you need to know so you can submit your proposal with confidence.

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$9.95

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Quick and Dirty Guide to Writing a  Last Minute Proposal Quick and Dirty Guide to Writing a Last Minute Proposal

Simple and practical guidance for people who must complete a proposal against a tight deadline, with little or no advance preparation.  Enough said.

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$24.95

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Business Proposal Sample Makeover - Before and After Business Proposal Sample Makeover - Before and After On Sale!

See a real proposal, and discover what we like about it and what is wrong with it. You get much more than just a sample. You'll get our extensive review comments to help you understand how to apply the lessons learned.  We take the original proposal and give it a makeover.  You get to see the original proposal as well as the new and greatly improved version that we created.

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$34.95

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Discount Package Discount Package On Sale!

Provides you with electronic access to our tutorials and samples for less than half the cost of purchasing them separately. 

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$95.00

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Premium MustWin Membership Premium MustWin Membership HOT!

Get our solution to late starts, teams that don't work together, and reviews that provide too little guidance too late to do any good. Includes everything above and adds online training and the CapturePlanning.com MustWin Process, our step-by-step approach to capturing business opportunities. It provides huge benefits for companies that rely on winning proposals and is definitely our best value. 

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8 Things You Can Do To Transform Mediocre Proposal Writing Into Great Proposal Writing
Here are 8 simple things a non-writer can do to dramatically improve their proposal writing. Use this list to go through what you have written sentence by sentence. Doing so can transform your writing into a compelling and persuasive proposal and significantly improve your chances of winning.
  1. Is it written to get the highest score based on the evaluation criteria? If you are writing a proposal in response to an RFP that has written evaluation criteria, this is the most important thing for you to achieve. You should study the evaluation criteria and make sure that what you have written will get the highest score. Use their terminology as closely as possible. Anything you have written, no matter how important to you, will not help you win if it is not addressed in the evaluation criteria. The best thing you can do is to provide snippets that can easily be copied and pasted from what you wrote onto their evaluation forms to justify their score.
  2. How quickly can the evaluator find what they need to prove RFP compliance? If you are not compliant with every requirement, your proposal may not even get evaluated. When there are lots of proposals submitted, the easiest way to get out of reading them all is to disqualify as many as possible based on non-compliance. Make sure they can find all of the RFP requirements in your proposal and that they can easily match what they see in your proposal to those requirements.
  3. Does it include all of the keywords from the RFP? You must use the RFP’s terminology instead of your own (no matter how strongly you prefer to use certain terms. In fact, you should use all of the keywords from the RFP. The evaluator will be looking at the RFP and then looking at what you wrote to see where you have addressed what’s in the RFP. When they do that, they’ll be skimming for the keywords. You should make them easy to find.
  4. Does it answer all the questions the customer might have? An easy way to ensure that you answer the customer’s questions is to address “who,” “what,” “where,” “how,” “when,” and “why” in your response. Look at what you have written and ask yourself questions that start with those words. See if you can’t add detail to your response by providing answers to all of them.
  5. Does every sentence pass the “So what?” test? Have you written descriptive statements, cited qualifications, or made unsubstantiated claims in any sentence without explaining what matters and why? It is not enough to state your qualifications; you need to explain what matters about them and how the customer will benefit. The evaluator is often more interested in why something you said matters than the statement itself. Never assume that the value of a statement is obvious.
  6. Does what you wrote exceed the requirements of the RFP? Everyone is responding to the same RFP. Any competition will also be compliant. If you are merely compliant then at best you are competing solely on price and at worst vulnerable to someone else offering something better. Exceeding the specifications of the RFP does not have to mean increasing your price. If it’s a choice between two vendors with the same offering and one offers a better written response or does a better job of answering the customers (written and unwritten) questions, who do you think has the competitive advantage?
  7. Does it give the evaluator a reason to want what you are offering? The customer is making a purchase and has multiple offerings to choose from. Does your proposal give them reasons to want what you are offering more than what anyone else might be offering? This means you need to understand what they really want, which may or may not actually be found in the RFP. Your proposal must provide compelling reasons for the evaluator to select you (as opposed to someone else).
  8. Is it written from the customer's perspective and not simply a description of yourself? If every sentence starts with your company’s name, there’s a good chance that you have written about yourself and not about what matters to the evaluator. When you talk with a sales person, do you want to hear them talk all about themselves or do you want to hear them talk about what the offering will do for you and how you will benefit from it? Look at every sentence and make sure that every feature, attribute, or piece of information you provide is put into the customer’s context.
Want more?

Here is a link to 20 examples that show the difference between being merely good and being great when it comes to proposal writing.

 

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